Journal

Better Templates for Makin' Clothes

2006-12-01

I noticed recently that Linden Lab still has not fixed the individual template downloads on their templates page to include the UV Map layers I mention in my tutorial(s). I think I pointed this out around the time 1.1 came out, which was, well, a long time ago (October 2003). So make sure you download the entire set of templates—the UV map layers are in those files.

Or, alternatively, you can do what I do and use Chip Midnight’s fantastic, high resolution templates which include more detail (like where eyelashes are found).

Update Linden Lab once again changed the location of their template files without leaving a URL to forward requests, so I’ve updated where appropriate on my site.

Year Five is Upon Me

2007-04-30

F our years ago today I created a Second Life account and downloaded the SL beta client. Public land was plentiful and you could fly across the entire world in a couple minutes. Oh, how things have changed. I was planning on a long diatribe on the state of Second Life to mark my 4th anniversary, but I just don’t have the time—real life is extremely busy at the moment. I do have a couple more tutorial translations to post, and I apologize to the authors for not posting them sooner. I will get to them this week.

My thanks go out to my Second Life partner, Caroline Apollo, whom I’ve had a lot of fun with over the past couple years. I’m sorry I’ve been so absent this past year—it’s not for lack of wanting to be in-world, hanging out, and having fun.

I’ll save my laundry list of criticisms for the way Second Life is evolving under the stewardship of Linden Lab. For now I urge you to visit project open letter and add you signature if you feel inclined.

Year Four

2006-05-10

Three years have come and gone, and Second Life appears to be doing quite well. Twas not always the case. When I paid $160 for a lifetime account back in June 2003, money was tight at Linden Lab. That $160 was considered a bit of a risk. But I know all lifetime account holders felt it was worth it, felt there was something special about our little (see Fig. 1) virtual world. I don’t want to spend a lot of time reminiscing about the “good old days” because either you remember them or you don’t, and if you don’t, you probably don’t care. Suffice it to say that first year was special, and I’m sorry most of you didn’t get to experience it. There was a sense we were a tight-knit creative community building a world together free from the inevitable commercial interests. I didn’t do much socializing after that first year — indeed most of my Calling Cards are pre-2004 and I’m always happy to see how many oldies are logged in, even if we haven’t spoken in ages.

The truth is I rarely spend any time in-world. The bulk of my Second Life experience takes place in my imagination, my sketchpad, and Photoshop. I like being a content provider as opposed to consumer. Enhancing someone else’s virtual experience is very rewarding. My biggest thrill nowadays is when I receive an IM from a stranger saying how much they like my creations.

What will the future bring? Hopefully with LL’s rapid growth we’ll start to see some more features and a revamped client user interface. Given Linden Lab’s track record so far, it’s safe to say I won’t be holding my breath.

Human-Avatar Interaction

2008-04-12

I recently spent a couple of hours in Second Life attending a Caroline’s grand re-opening party. This was the longest stretch of time (about 3 hours) I had been in world in quite a while. Apart from the occasional customer service issue which requires me to jump in world, I don’t visit SL much any more. I’ll have more thoughts in a post marking my 5 year rez-day in a couple of weeks.

At the party eveyone was dancing and there was a central “dance ball” that anyone could touch that would animate his/her avatar. The dances were nothing to write home about—I recognized many bits and pieces that were ripped straight from old Poser 4 (I think it was 4) stock animation and combined with other “found” animation. (Test animations I had uploaded during the 1.4 Preview back in June 2004, if that tells you anything). Other individuals had a variety of different dance animations, some of which I really liked.

While everyone dancing together and listening to the same music/dj is great fun, the only difference between last week’s experience and parties we had in 2003 was the scripted dance animation. Don’t get me wrong, I think animation is great and SL 1.4 was probably one of the most exciting releases to date. And while there are advantages to pre-scripted animation allowing everyone to type and chat, I really longed for more direct interaction.

As chance would have it I was alerted to two bits of info last week which seemed to provide a possible solution to my desire for more direct human-avatar interaction. The first was a tweet from Lordfly about a project that was started back in 2006 by a dev team at LL (Cube Linden, Aura Linden, and Ventrella Linden) called Avatar Puppeteering. Please do check out some of the videos on the site for a working example of puppeteering in action. The project certainly showed a lot of promise. That is, before it was put on indefinite hold so that the team members could work on “viewer stability, bug fixing, and performance” issues. Tateru over at Massively has done a little digging and found out that Ventrella (and, yes, he was responsible for flexi-prims) left LL last year. Her conclusion is that this project has suffered perma-death.

Which is unfortunate because Mitch Kapor, LL’s Chairman, seems to have become interested in human-avatar interaction himself. According to this article Kapor and developer Philippe Bossut have been developing a hands-free, camera-based interface for Second Life. You can visit Kapor’s site to view a demonstration.

Given these projects and the success of accelerometer-based interaction of the Nintendo Wii and Apple iPhone and camera-based interaction like Sony’s Eye-Toy, some form of more advanced human-avatar interaction is coming. Will it come from Linden Lab? I wouldn’t get your hopes up.